Math = Love: Monday Must Reads: Volume 23

Monday, December 18, 2017

Monday Must Reads: Volume 23

Happy Monday! Today is the last Monday of the semester, so that makes it an especially happy Monday! Today I find myself giving and grading semester tests, doing notebook checks, and looking forward to spending the evening with my husband at an OKC Thunder Game tonight. As a perk for being a finalist for Oklahoma Teacher of the Year earlier in the year, I have been named the "Teacher of the Game" for the game tonight. We get to watch the game from courtside seats with free food plus I get some prizes and a $75 gift card to take home for classroom supplies.


My husband and I have never been to a professional basketball game before, so this will be a new experience for both of us. I can't exactly share my Thunder experience with you, but I can share this week's "Must Reads." (Almost) Every Monday, I share the links that caught my eye the previous week on my blog.



Tallin Lamonaca shares a great visual for solving systems by substitution using monopoly money and monopoly game pieces.

Image Source: https://twitter.com/LamonacaMath/status/941473982544535553
Looking for a great Christmas review idea? McLaren History shares an idea that produces a cute room decoration. Have students answer questions on green paper and use the answers to build a tree. I love that this task can be used for ANY subject!

Image Source: https://twitter.com/McLaren_History/status/941711564347985920
Mrs PB offers up an idea to encourage students to practice recall. Students are given a paper with two columns, cops and robbers. In the cops column, students write down everything they remember about the topic. After students share the facts they remember, students write down the things they didn't recall but other students shared in the robbers column. This would make a great review at the end of a unit.

Image Source: https://twitter.com/DramaPatch/status/941744349234253824
I love how Hannah Oldham has her students do not only statistical research but share their findings in a visual manner.

Image Source: https://twitter.com/MathOldham/status/926149587185827846
Need more proof that Hannah Oldham's twitter account is a must-follow? Check out this project where students predicted the spread of a virus and created an ornament to represent how many days they each survived.

Image Source: https://twitter.com/MathOldham/status/941054404052049920
I learned to love the Game of Set at a local math teachers' circle event. So, I was super excited to see that Ed Southall attempt to build a Rubik's Set Cube. How cool is this?!?

Image Source: https://twitter.com/solvemymaths/status/941635763934040064
Chris Smith's maths newsletter is a must-read. If you haven't subscribed yet, what are you waiting for? (Subscribe for free by emailing aap03102@gmail.com!) You are missing interesting puzzles each week like this week's Christmas-themed puzzle.

Image Source: https://twitter.com/aap03102/status/941998292052922373
Liz Gosky makes me wish that I taught chemistry in a proper lab setting. These copper plated ornaments are gorgeous!

Image Source: https://twitter.com/GoskyLiz/status/941720058786664448
Sue Choi poses an interesting task: can a million dollars fit in a copy box?

Image Source: https://twitter.com/sfmathcoach/status/941673204174729216
Lori Doering shares a photo of the way the teachers in her building are working on students' mindset. I wish all of my students saw themselves as "Algebra Geniuses."

Image Source: https://twitter.com/LoriDoering/status/928993861912887296
Jae Ess created a wonderful maze to give students practice with the converse of the pythagorean theorem. I love the method of having students show their work, as well!

Image Source: https://twitter.com/jaegetsreal/status/941407458895060994
Kim Spek is getting her calculus students in the Christmas spirit with a volume of revolution ornament creation activity.

Image Source: https://twitter.com/kvdspek/status/941339112497385473
I know that Thanksgiving is 11+ months away now, but I can't help but share Ms. Rawding's Turkeys in the Field activity that involves having students create a latin square puzzle.

Image Source: https://twitter.com/FiskeMath/status/932640420772958212
Daniel Kaufmann combines clothesline math with statistics. I'm looking forward to using these correlation cards later in the year!

Image Source: https://twitter.com/KauDan721/status/940418635478261761
DCDSB Math's Twitter account is a must-see if you are looking for Christmas related math tasks for your classroom! Check out a few of my favorites:

Image Source: https://twitter.com/DCDSBMath/status/938060396094619650
Image Source: https://twitter.com/DCDSBMath/status/938446368410099713
Image Source: https://twitter.com/DCDSBMath/status/940360747292299264
Image Source: https://twitter.com/DCDSBMath/status/811203273428520960
Image Source: https://twitter.com/DCDSBMath/status/809033167944433664
Here's the same photo but with a different question:

Image Source: https://twitter.com/DCDSBMath/status/809382480809775104
Image Source: https://twitter.com/DCDSBMath/status/812274807748329472
Image Source: https://twitter.com/DCDSBMath/status/940561008149401600
Isobel Mort shares a great real-life application task involving geometry and Red Bull. I think it would be interesting to give students a selection of cans and have them order them based on perceived wastage. Then, they could calculate the wasted package for each and compare to their predictions.

Image Source: https://twitter.com/IsobelMort19/status/935982272926191616
Mr. Bayle shares a fun, festive activity. Can you count how many times the words Jingle, Bell, and Rock show up in the song Jingle Bell Rock?

Image Source: https://twitter.com/mrbaylemaths/status/940341368068681728
When I used to teach Algebra 2, I would engage my students in the question of how many times would you have to fold a piece of paper to reach the moon. Alex Overwijk takes this idea a step further by actually illustrating the process.

Image Source: https://twitter.com/AlexOverwijk/status/938105334903726080
TheChalkface shares some amazing posters/printables for summaries of six different geometric shapes. You can download them for free here.

Image Source: https://twitter.com/the_chalkface/status/939585102958428160
I have always written the date on the dry erase board as a math problem. But, Lauren Wexler takes this idea even further by having each student write their own math date!

Image Source: https://twitter.com/wex_math/status/924777143376150529
Jon Orr shares a great polygon pile up task. If I ever teach geometry, I will definitely be using this idea. You can get more details here.

Image Source: https://twitter.com/MrOrr_geek/status/939615099836424192
Until next week, keep sharing!

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